Wishek School District

Explanation
This graph illustrates student progress towards meeting growth expectations through the last two years of achievement scores on NDSA for the subjects of English Language Arts and Math for students in the 3rd through 8th grades. Schools assess students yearly on the state assessments. These results make up the yearly progress for Student Achievement. We determine student growth over two years for students who have taken the state assessments consecutively across the 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 school years to measure progress. The objective is to encourage students to improve their performance on state assessments no matter which level of proficiency is achieved in the assessed subjects for Math and/or English Language Arts.

As the graph below shows, here are the definitions for each growth level:

Exceeds Expectations: At least 1.5 year of growth for each year
Meets Expectations: Between 1 and 1.5 year of growth for each year
Approaching Expectations: Between .5 and 1.0 year of growth for each year
Does Not Meet Expectations: Less than .5 year of growth for each year

Student Growth Percentiles:
Student Growth Percentiles (SGP) help compare student performance over time, communicate disparities in prior year student performance within and among and among student, school, and district populations. Percentile groupings are made based on their prior year’s performance. Students are then ranked by percentile based on their current year’s performance and grade level. For example, a student within the 40th percentile performed at a level above 40% of the other grouped students and below 60% of students within the same grade level.

Given a student’s beginning performance in relation to the achievement level, and the amount of growth a student has shown, the amount of sustained growth that a student would need to reach proficiency can be calculated. By extrapolation, the probability that a student will meet the criterion can also be determined (Betebenner, 2009; Bonk et al., 2012).

Student Growth Percentiles enable answering these questions (Betebenner, 2009; Bonk et al., 2012):
What is the growth rate of a student/school/district?
What should the growth rate be to reach proficiency?
What are the highest sustained growth rates?
How can growth rates be improved?

Methodology:
Three consecutive years of scaled achievement scores along with achievement level, as defined by the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction, were investigated where available. Scores were acquired from students within grades 3 through 8.

In order to calculate a student’s growth percentile all students were assigned to a peer set based on their grade and achievement level. The changes in scores were based on the most current year’s scale score relative to the prior year scale score to create a difference. These differences were then ordered from least to greatest within their appropriate peer group in order to calculate the percentile of growth experienced by a student. Overall Institution growth was calculated as the average percentile growth of measureable students within a school.

When student scores were available for three consecutive years, students were matched on their achievement level for the first two years as well as their respective grades during this period. The change in scores was the difference in scale scores over the three years. Percentiles were calculated for the matched prior two year achievement levels and corresponding grade increases.

References:
Betebenner, D. (2009). Norm- and Criterion-Referenced Student Growth. Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice, 28(4), 42–51 Bonk, W., Copa, J., Gibson, N., Gillin, T., Nau, J., Peoples, A. L., Woolard, C. (2012). Growth models: Issues and advice from the states. Washington, DC: Institute of Education Sciences Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems Grant Program.

To protect student privacy, data for schools who have less than 10 students will not be displayed.

Please contact North Dakota's Department of Public Instruction with any questions and feedback via email to the following address: dpidashboard@nd.gov
This graph illustrates student progress towards meeting growth expectations through the last two years of achievement scores on NDSA for the subjects of English Language Arts and Math for students in the 3rd through 8th grades. Schools assess students yearly on the state assessments. These results make up the yearly progress for Student Achievement. We determine student growth over two years for students who have taken the state assessments consecutively across the 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 school years to measure progress. The objective is to encourage students to improve their performance on state assessments no matter which level of proficiency is achieved in the assessed subjects for Math and/or English Language Arts.

As the graph below shows, here are the definitions for each growth level:

Exceeds Expectations: At least 1.5 year of growth for each year
Meets Expectations: Between 1 and 1.5 year of growth for each year
Approaching Expectations: Between .5 and 1.0 year of growth for each year
Does Not Meet Expectations: Less than .5 year of growth for each year

Student Growth Percentiles:
Student Growth Percentiles (SGP) help compare student performance over time, communicate disparities in prior year student performance within and among and among student, school, and district populations. Percentile groupings are made based on their prior year’s performance. Students are then ranked by percentile based on their current year’s performance and grade level. For example, a student within the 40th percentile performed at a level above 40% of the other grouped students and below 60% of students within the same grade level.

Given a student’s beginning performance in relation to the achievement level, and the amount of growth a student has shown, the amount of sustained growth that a student would need to reach proficiency can be calculated. By extrapolation, the probability that a student will meet the criterion can also be determined (Betebenner, 2009; Bonk et al., 2012).

Student Growth Percentiles enable answering these questions (Betebenner, 2009; Bonk et al., 2012):
What is the growth rate of a student/school/district?
What should the growth rate be to reach proficiency?
What are the highest sustained growth rates?
How can growth rates be improved?

Methodology:
Three consecutive years of scaled achievement scores along with achievement level, as defined by the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction, were investigated where available. Scores were acquired from students within grades 3 through 8.

In order to calculate a student’s growth percentile all students were assigned to a peer set based on their grade and achievement level. The changes in scores were based on the most current year’s scale score relative to the prior year scale score to create a difference. These differences were then ordered from least to greatest within their appropriate peer group in order to calculate the percentile of growth experienced by a student. Overall Institution growth was calculated as the average percentile growth of measureable students within a school.

When student scores were available for three consecutive years, students were matched on their achievement level for the first two years as well as their respective grades during this period. The change in scores was the difference in scale scores over the three years. Percentiles were calculated for the matched prior two year achievement levels and corresponding grade increases.

References:
Betebenner, D. (2009). Norm- and Criterion-Referenced Student Growth. Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice, 28(4), 42–51 Bonk, W., Copa, J., Gibson, N., Gillin, T., Nau, J., Peoples, A. L., Woolard, C. (2012). Growth models: Issues and advice from the states. Washington, DC: Institute of Education Sciences Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems Grant Program.

To protect student privacy, data for schools who have less than 10 students will not be displayed.

Please contact North Dakota's Department of Public Instruction with any questions and feedback via email to the following address: dpidashboard@nd.gov